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Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
senator chuck kagel and make it to the pentagon? >> the house did not take up the tax measure today because it did on have sufficient support from our members to pass. house speaker john boehner's statement thursday evening as he stood in print of the republican conference, he recited the serenity prayer. god, grant me the serenity to accept the things which i cannot change and close the house for business until after christmas. there is no place like an empty house for the holidays. thus diane john boehner's plan b, which was destined to die anyway. >> let me be clear. speaker boehner's plans are nonstarters in the senate. >> boehner appeared friday morning and said, if this thing were easy, it would have been done decades ago. >> i am interested in solving the major problems that face our country. that means house leaders, senate leaders, and the president, are going to have to continue to work together to address those concerns. >> the president lifted his number to 400,000, no tax hikes for anyone making less than that, boehner says the million, still no deal. what happened out
. [ sniffles ] ♪ >> harris: breaking news now on the fox report and the pentagon confirming to fox news that retired general norman schwarzkopf has died. he commanded the coalition that pushed saddam hussein's forces out of kuwait in 1991. bob scales on the phone with us now. general scales you wrote a book called certain victory and you have a lot of knowledge of the history of the iraq war but personal knowledge with this man. you call him truly the first great american hero after vietnam. your thoughts? >> that is exactly right, harris. remember, i come from the same generation as general schwarzkopf and the vector was the vindication of my generation report vietnam generation because it was our first great military victory after defeat in vietnam and he took that personally. i knew general schwarzkopf well, going back to his time as a major in the pentagon. he also carried in his sack this rock that had the sigma that went with the defeat in vietnam. when defeated the iraqi military in the plains of iraq, when was able to do that one of the first things he said at the truce tent was
and eventually moving to the pentagon where he became the director of defense research and engineering then air force secretary and eventually defense secretary. his ability to handle a staggering workload are legend including read and annotating 400 page briefing books overnight. during the career brown shaped fighters like the f-15 and f-16 that remain the air force's backbone fleet today. and championed jointness among the military serv before the failed iran hostage rescue mission convinced others to follow. now 85, brown continues to serve on the defense policy board and is a trustee of the center for strategic and international studies. with joyce winds low, brown recently co-authored "star- spangled security" applying lessons safeguarding america. i asked him whether jointness was too far as some critics argue. >> not every operation requires jointness. i'm sure there are some that can be best handled by a single service. and by an element rather far down in the table of organization of that service. nevertheless, i believe that the idea of jointness, joint operations, is correct because
and challenges you confront. in this job, i have tried to be as accessible as i can to the pentagon press corps to engage regularly with reporters and to encourage other senior officials in the department to do the same. it is an especially important time to communicate our vision and our priorities as a department. as i have said time and time again over this past year, i believe that we are at a strategic turning point. after more than a decade of war, the longest extended period of conflict in the history of the united states. at the beginning of 2012, president obama and the military and civilian leaders of the department came together to publicly release a new defense strategy. it was designed to help the military affectively navigate this turning point and prepare for the future. under that strategy, our goal was to reshape the force of the 21st century. to try to meet the new security challenges that we are confronted in this world and try to help the country at the same time reduce the deficits which are confronting. we were handed a number and the budget control act to reduce the defen
from vietnam wh two purple hearts, talk about him going to the pentagon. there are some republicans who were not t very happy with hiss formerer republican senator. why? >> chuckck hagel had orders to go to germany. he was at fort d, new jersey and said i wanted to go to vietnam. they made him talk to the chaplain and pchologist. after two weeks, he went to vietnam. he has fought for his countntry unlike his critics. he has bled for his country unlike his critics. hehe understands war, unlike hisis critics. he does not have other incentives like dick cheney. he is prepared and r ready. bill cohen said it best. he has fought and bled for thisis country. he knows the subject matter. ask jim jones and other national securitydvisers. >> iraq and iran, that is what upsets people about huck hagel. >> he supported the war in iraq, voted in favor, and supported the war in afghanistan. it is an odd de that supported the two were that all the critics are now crying. he also, when it camtime to dean what was a losing war in iraq with the surge, he not only opopposed it he said it would be the wors
was the one guy who understood how to stop that. he used to talk about "those boys at the pentagon," i know them. >> he knew those boys at the pentagon. doris, here's a great example of lyndon johnson, the man you knew so well. lyndon johnson wouldn't go out holding press conferences talking act eisenhower. this segment is not going to be about ike, but it is -- we're just talking about presidents who rise and presidents who fall. eisenhower's on his way up by now. but you had, of course, lbj constantly drawing on johnson's -- on eisenhower's wisdom. >> and, you know, the great thing about eisenhower, too, was just that he was so popular among the people. that great song "i like ike, because ike is easy to like," no one else had such a good song. but lbj is rising, too, and i think it's about time that he does. he left under such a cloud, the scar in vietnam so, so painful at the time he left, and the combination now of some distance from the war, the recognition that what he accomplished domestically we cannot take for granted, three great civil rights laws, medicare, just the vibrancy in
security posture. interagency teams give particular scrutiny to high threat posed. the pentagon agreed to dispatch additional marines to post around the world. we asked congress for funds to hire new diplomatic security personnel. we're updating our diplomat procedures to increase the number of experienced and well- trained staffs serving at those posts. tom and i will be discussing all this work and more with congress tomorrow. for now, let me make one other point. i have been a proud member of the foreign service for more than 30 years. i've had the honor of serving as a chief of mission overseas. i know that diplomacy by its very nature must sometimes be practiced in dangerous places. chris stevens understood that our diplomats may not work in bunkers and do their jobs. it is important to recognize that our colleagues in the bureau's of diplomatic security at home and abroad did it right countless times a day for years on end. but we have learned some very hard and painful lessons benghazi. we're already acting on them. we have to do more to constantly improve, reduce the risks that
the decision to invade iraq in 2003, but later, criticized the pentagon's war planning. mostly, though, schwarzkopf devoted his time to serving as a board member and spokesman for charitable causes, living quietly in tampa, florida, where he died yesterday at the age of 78. in a statement, the first president bush, now ailing himself, called his gulf war commander "a true american patriot and one of the great military leaders of his generation." for more on general schwarzkopf and his legacy, we are joined by "new york times" reporter michael gordon. he co-authored the book, "the generals' war: the inside story of the conflict in the gulf." michael, welcome. take us back first of all to the gulf war more than two decades ago. what was it about general schwarzkopf and what he did is that made him be regarded at least by many as a hero. >> well, this is the time in which the american military did not have the confidence of the american public the way it does now. whatever people think of the wars in afghanistan or iraq, they generally believe that the military has done its part. and that
part of some last-second deal. hit the defense department. but the pentagon's real problem is not those cuts, but the ones that are going to be coming over the next decade. we talked to military contractors, top officials at the pentagon. they see a long period of downward decline. that after the war in afghanistan, there's going to be a period of austerity. they're calling it -- they have a term around the pentagon, a very graphic self-amputation as they cut back over the years. and this was one of the reasons that president obama had, at the top of his short list, the former republican senator, still a republican, chuck hagel of nebraska. he's somebody who's talked about the pentagon as being bloated, had very specific ideas about how to cut it. but mike, sam, the table, we're hearing that that trial balloon has been popped. that senator hagel has a possibility for secretary of defense, has really lost a lot of altitude. and what they discovered was, there's not a natural constituency for him. republicans, as you guys know, have fought with him over the years. he was against the war i
and many communications networks were iin-- were inoperable. so when the pentagon was hit and the capitol was evacuated, my staff and i walked one block to my home on capitol hill, just as an ark example, the husband of y office manager worked in the section of the pentagon that had been hit. so we were on the phone -- the one phone that we had -- to hospitals, the police, to anyone that we thought might be able to tell us if he was safe. thankfully, he was fine. but ther were so many who waited for hours, who called hospitals to hear from their loved ones. sometimes the news was a relief, and sometimes they waited in vain for good news. and i have to say that it was an incredible moment when the senators who could find each other wherever they had gone from the capitol, we finally gathered early -- well, late afternoon in the capitol police headquarters to talk to our leaders, who had been taken to an undisclosed location. and they said, we don't want anyone to come, but we are going to the steps of the capitol to hold a press conference. we don't want anyone there because we don't know
exhibits a skepticism, who would be at the helm of the pentagon. >> but at this point obama is going to look really weak if he doesn't own hagel. and he's been so silent. i really just don't understand why because he has political capital right now, he should use it, but he's not coming out to defend these candidates who are putting themselves on the line for him. >> he came out to defend susan rice strongly but that didn't necessarily turn the tide. aaron, i'm curious if you think this ends up being a test case for how, for where we draw the boundaries of what is acceptable or unacceptable outside the sort of boundaries of what we will allow if hagel's nomination is sunk or are the stakes not that high? >> well, i think they are high for the administration because i worked for half a dozen secretaries of state. what i've seen over the last three weeks in washington is virtually unprecedented. this is the second punitive nominee, i mean, there hasn't even been a formal announcement of a nomination. the first was susan rice. and now she was preemptively basically forced to withdraw. a
of the show and they just kind of, we got calls from people from the pentagon and from politicians. both shows were done and conceived without cooperation and without any purported. connection to how they actually run. it was never part of the promises. i've attempted some shows that have not seen the light of day with cooperation of government agencies. i worked for a long time on a show with the f.b.i. and also with nasa, negotiate of which probably not unco--- probably not coins dently came to fruition. but these shows "homeland" -- "24" made up it's own organization c.. the u. to avoid it and with "homeland" it was a step towards reality so it does elude to the cia. but -- >> our relationship with the military was interesting because obviously these agencies want to keep arm's length. and once they became fans -- i think it was that simple, they just enjoyed it and felt this is portraying when we did portray a general or soldier, the military became cooperative. so we had a pentagon lie ace son. it got to the point we said we need a couple of f-16s they said sure. it got great. a lot of pr
the pentagon spent four years and $17,000 researching ied detection they announced that nothing is better than a dog. >> having a dog on point is very important and they have saved many lives. >> coming up, the unbreakababab [ male announcer ] when it comes to the financial obstacles military families face, we understan at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] ♪ [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings advice. call or visit us online. we're ready to help. >>> here at lackland air force base in texas, dogs aren't the only ones receiving training. so are military working dog handlers. >> i wanted to keep things, the longer you are with the dog the more he wants to work for you. >> before they are ready deploy with their dogs handlers first need to experience what it is like on the receiving end of a dog in attack mode. >> it is imperative that we train as we fight that we make training ve
. that became more and more until the publication of "the pentagon papers." that was a gradual growth come a difference, between the media the new york times" and the administration, and that continues until the state. there is an oscillation between the administration and "the times" depending on the administration. that difference opened up cordially there, and it continued to. the skepticism to the vietnam war, and watergate, which is mostly "washington post" storage, increased trade gradually we have what we have today, an adversarial right fox, adversarial left, msnbc, and cnn, which is trying to be "the new york times," when nobody wants to see a non- adversarial. "the times" is a two-section newspaper, a term that "the times" does not like any more. the editor -- when you use in it, they get a little bit squeamish. some of you i should probably it, one of my sources -- took a great deal of reading the, and interviews. "the times" is generous in giving me access, letting the interview them. mostly, i got this through approaching them and asking them, and one led to the other. approa
. by contrast, the international affairs budget is less than one-tenth of the pentagon's. secretary gates has spoken about this and strongly urged the congress to address that imbalance. we have not yet. admiral mullen pointed out, the more diplomacy is cut, the more lives are lost. we have to make certain that we are not penny-wise and pound-foolish when it comes to supporting americas vital overseas interests. adequately funding foreign-policy initiatives is not spending, but investing in our long-term security, and more often or not, it saves far more expensive expenditures in dollars and lives in the conflicts that we fail to see or avoid. we need to invest in america's long-term interest in order to do the job of diplomacy in a dangerous world. this report makes that crystal clear. since 1985, i have had the privilege of making official journeys to one trouble spot or another. i have met a lot of our men and women in the foreign services. we sat and talked about the work they do and the lives that they lead. they spent years learning the languages of the country so they can be on the fro
is a couple mission of the pentagon to it that was a andual i'll live to milan in administration. but it does not interest otters up continually there. this skepticism for the vietnam war and watergate which is mostly the washington post dory increased. the press became adversarial and maybe it will we have to have men ever serial left at have one cnn which is kind of trying to be the new york times and people are talking abut that people are not adversarial news. the stock above the neck down is it to section the newspaper. i notice the public editor who has probably talk to the look less people less times that i have have said, the day's paper is the granddaddy best friend of nuclear plant. the individual was get a little bit squeamish. some of you think i should say where are my sources. the book was a great deal of reading, i also was a very temperance and times of generous and giving me access. as one person or any view and expect to be. 1999-201. . all of the executive editress. by the time we were involved in this process a tentative before -- 1834 was a secondary investing. >> it does
called me after the pentagon was hit. mom he said, i'm on duty and we were locking down bancrofts hall in getting our weapons. we may be a target. don't expect to hear from me for a while. this class of 2002 with transition immediately to a war and for the first time started on our soil. little did i know that my time with matthew at memorial hall was a foreshadowing of massey's future. today his name is listed with those he knew but under the new title, war on terror. matthew was chosen from marine aviation went through many trials and hardships before finally going into the first squadron in japan. there he became an gauge to the girl he loved and was on top of the world. when extra troops failed to arrive in afghanistan that summer, the summer of 2009, matthew volunteered on the ground to help out. the absolutely found his niche with those marines. he took leave the first of july and secretly married theresa. july 10 was the last time i saw him. he arrived in afghanistan the end of july and wrote these final words in his journal on august 2. mom, dad, i can never repay you for all y
from the white house on this. here is former pentagon adviser michael rubin. >> thanks for having me, michelle. >> what should the white house do in response to this? >> ultimately, what with will have to be inspected and considered is the whole nature of the reset policy. if we trace the beginnings of this crisis back it actually started with the white house reaching out to vladimir putin to russia in supporting russia's accession to the world trade organization. the amendment which had govern the a lot of u.s.-russian/soviet relations going back to the 1970s had to be replaced. it was replaced in congress by the act which set russia's worst human viets violators there should be consequences when it comes to getting visas. vladimir mute indecided to lash out to the united states by pointing a figurative rifle at the head of russia's orphans. >> we improve russia's trade relation with us, officially and then he gets upset because buried within there is a little clause that says, as you point out, the worst human rights violators should have trouble getting into the united states. how
that preparation before running into the pentagon and he has done a is he person job. very tough job. even he said that we face some dire devastating times ahead if sequestration goes ahead. chuck hagel seems to think that we can cut, quote, more the bloat out of the pentagon. there probably is some over there. but you need to understand the system right, given of the republican opposition i don't know that the president gets a lot of credit for bipartisanship. more likely the cuts that they agree on. lt. colonel bob maginnis thanks so much we appreciate it. >> thanks, dave. >> small businesses set to take big hits in 2013. that could take an effect on your wallet. we'll explain next. my pet chicken just saved my life. how this hero bird came to the rescue of an entire family. and that's not even the coolest part of this story. i'm sticking around. mine was earned off vietnam in 1968. over the south pacific in 1943. i got mine in iraq, 2003. usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation. because offers a superior level of protection, and because usaa's commitment to serve
of faith with our soldiers makes him not the right man to leave the pentagon. he went on in 2007 not only to oppose the surge and delay war funding and vote for a mandatory withdrawal from iraq at the same time. >> i want to quote directly from senator heigle at that time. there will be no defeat and no victory for the united states in iraq. and the time for more troops in iraq has passed. and it went on to say that -- i will just read this here, my comments 14 years ago were in -- actually this is in regard to a different issue. let's take that off and we will get to that in a moment. you were the platoon leader before it even happened. >> i was leading a 41-man with the 101st airborne in baghdad in 2006. those men fought bravely. they helped stabilize our sector of the city 1k3 defeat al-qaeda and other foreign terrorists and protect other civilians. they are proud of their accomplishments and no one told them at the time we would not achieve victory and we needed to withdraw from the country. today's fighting troops we have 68,000 troops in afghanistan. they deserve secretary of defens
with the sequester? where are we on the pentagon cuts? >> nobody wants those pentagon cuts, including the president of the united states. there may be some on the left who would favor that. but that's not a dominant position. that's not where the political center of gravity is in the country. i think it's very likely that those sequester cuts are going to be turned off. now, remember the sequester, $1.2 trillion over the next nine years. that's a little over $100 billion a year. so half of that is defense, half of that is discretionary. the kick the can mini deal solution that we're talking about would identify some subset of spending cuts that would be the lowest hanging fruit still available that might turn off the sequester, or they could just turn off the trigger all together. the sequester exists because of a law passed by congress, another law passed by congress could change it. >> good to see you, john. thanks for the update. >> mastercard spending pulse saying it's the lowest level of 2008. high end is one of the areas getting hit hard. tom is managing director at the tellsee advisory group
over its price. but lockheed and the pentagon have come to terms to buy another round of the jets for nearly $4 billion. morgan stanley calls the f-35 the single most important investment debate over lockheed stock. second, cash will be king. as defense spending slows, analysts say many defense companies will reduce share buyback programs and conservative capital. and look to international customers to make up for lost business at home. third, it's a bird, it's a plane, it's big brother. as criticism rises over the use of drone strikes by the obama administration, look to see companies launching drone war at home for deals to build unmanned aircraft for domestic use. the faa says there could be 30,000 uavs in u.s. skies by 2020. the teal group says domestic drones could be worth $89 billion over ten years, as everyone from homeland security to tmz wants permission to use them. >>> let's get some more insight on the defense skprkt how to play it as the fiscal cliff deadline grows closer. howard rubel is with jeffries. great to speak with you. and i guess key to understanding the im
, so do have the debt ceiling fight coming up. when you say that it faces and, you expect the pentagon to say we would just hold everything? certainly years, serving months ahead of time. they have to plan on how many people to have in their workforce -- in the force, recruiting. you cannot turn on a dime, like a huge oil tanker. >> john, we will focus on folks that we did not know who are here. we will come right back. don't go away. take five minutes. >> this is just -- >> we saw senators mccain and 11 decide they will come back in a couple of minutes. as we wait, back to something that took place earlier this morning outside the capital. -- the capitol. >> i want to thank you for being here to call on house republicans not to drop the ball on the middle-class. also for the house to show up for work, right? the president is down at the white house, senator harkin and his colleagues are here. they are out on a paid vacation right now. boehner walked out of the allegations with the present and then he walked out of the house and tell all members to go home while we are four days away f
partnering with the pentagon to send 35 additional detachments of the marine security guards that's about 235 marines to the medium and high for outposts where they will serve as a visible deterrent to a hostile act. that is on top of the 150 detachments we already deployed. we are aligning resources in the 2013 budget request to address the physical form a devotees and reinforce the structures wherever needed to address the risk from fire. let me add we may need your help to ensure that we have the authority to streamline the usual process that produced faster results. we are seeking to hire more than 150 diplomatic security personnel and increased 5% to provide them with the equipment and training that they need. there is the arb recommended we will target them squarely at securing our - outposts. i want to second the praise for the professionals. i served in this department for only two years having come from the private sector. however, as i travel to places like iraq, afghanistan and pakistan i have seen firsthand how the dedicated men and women risk their lives. we all hold them with a
of the attack? this raises questions that the pentagon and the defense department must consider. what greater world the we need the military to play a defense of personnel overseas, especially in the broader middle east that has been never more unsettled? what is the right military posture for forces in the region? what do we need them to do? conversations about the military and defense right now, are mostly about budgets and numbers. it is important to talk more about objectives, strategy, and policies since the attack in benghazi could represent a kind of new normal in our dangerous world. the defense department needs to answer these questions. i might add in the authorization bill we added authorization for 1000 additional marines to be used to protect our installations, diplomatic installations overseas. it is essential for the community to conduct a similar arb-type effort. why did it take more than a week for the eye witnesses' accounts to reach our analysts put these witnesses could have told them in minutes there was no protest at our consulate, a conclusion that in the absence of thi
that would hit the pentagon. it may be difficult to rally republican votes if they cannot turn off the sequester. on the democratic side, the estate tax could be a problem. the republicans are insisting that the estate tax stay at current levels, which is exempt states up to $5 million. many democrats would like to see -- in january, it is scheduled to come -- it is scheduled to go up dramatically. on states as small as a million dollars would be taxed. most democrats want to see something in the middle. they're adamant that we cannot exempt states as large as $5 million. that could be another sticking point. >> lori montgomery, to expect anything else to go on today? when is the earliest that the senators will come back in for session tomorrow? >> the senate is due back in at 1:00. the house is due at 6:30. the house is the big question mark. it is very difficult to imagine what could pass the house. as for today, it is an excellent question. the senate is not in, the house is not in. my understanding is we're going to have basically everyone working quietly to see if we can reach
with the cuts that would hit the pentagon. it may be difficult to rally republican votes if they cannot turn off the sequester. and the democratic side, the estate tax could be a problem. republicans are insisting that the estate tax stay at current .evels, which is exemp many democrats would like to see -- in january, it is scheduled to go up automaticalldramatically. most democrats want to see something in the middle. they are adamant that we cannot exempt states as large as $5 million. >> lori montgomery, do we expect anything going on today, and if not, when is the earliest the senators will come back and recession tomorrow? >> the senate is due back in at 1:00. the house is due in at 6:30. the house is the big question mark here. as for today, it is an excellent question. the senate is not in. the house is not in. my understanding is we're going to have basically everyone working quietly to see if we can reach an agreement co. i will be interesting to see if they give us any information today. >> lori montgomery of the "washington post." find her articles at wp.com. >> both chambers of cong
to washington, it is not a philanthropic act on the pentagon's part. the united states federal government -- unless europe is dollar rise, unless they do not have dollars to spend purchasing the net exports of those who have surpluses, then they will stop having surplus. this is the surplus recycling mechanism. thus, we have the 20 years of the golden age. a period of immense stability very low inflation. universal growth. we had other problems. the lease from the macroeconomic point of view, it was a golden age. why is that? because the global surplus of recycling mechanism was sustained. why? because the united states stopped having a surplus by the end of the 1960's. how can you recycle surplus if you cannot have it. well, paul volcker -- been named may ring a bell. in 1971, paul volcker was an unknown working for another american. henry kissinger, who you may have heard of. before he became secretary of state. whener's paper, which are i read a few years ago, i thought it was the most remarkable document ever to emerge from washington in the last few years. looking at the emerging eco
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)